Sgt. Pepper’s Café is a great place to eat, especially for music lovers

Named after The Beatles’ 1967 album “Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band,” the café takes you back in time the second you walk in. The establishment is built old-school diner style, with the atmosphere decorated like a musical blast from the past. Photos, records and other artistic elements related to the band fill the space up beautifully, while their music plays over speakers in the background. 

 

For my sandwich choice, I went with the Reuben, which is made with rye bread, Thousand Island on request, sauerkraut, corned beef or turkey and Swiss cheese (which I had to take out due to lactose intolerance.) All sandwiches at the café come with fries, which in this case was a good addition for the $15 price.

 

The fries were golden and fluffy, and reminded me greatly of homemade fries. The sandwich itself was good! The bread was buttered, the beef was tender and flavorful, and the mixture of the toppings gave me the tang I was looking for. Paired with the fries, the flavors really balanced themselves out. 

 

The restaurant also serves all-day breakfast as well as horseshoes, an infamous open faced sandwich, which the person I was eating with chose. On top of a base of bread was deep fried chicken, a load of fries and cheese sauce. After trying both, he rated it slightly higher than my sandwich. 

 

If you’re a fan of The Beatles, psychedelic rock music and/or the 60s, eating at the café would be a great experience.

 

Taste: 4/5

Appearance: 4/5

Price: 3/5  

 

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